Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics

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Compiled and edited by: René Genis and Sijmen Tol

Introduction by: Marc L. Greenberg

Subscriptions: see Brill.com

Contributors

The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics is made possible by the valuable work of our contributing linguists around the world, who gather, compile and annotate bibliographical references within their field of expertise.

Anne Aarssen (Leiden)

Ekaterina Bobyleva (Amsterdam)

Sofiya Dmitrieva (Sankt-Peterburg)

Snježana Kordić

Milica Mirkulovska (Skopje)

Jurij Mosenkis (Kyjiv)

Lidija Nepop (Kyjiv)

Hella Olbertz (Amsterdam)

Martin Ološtiak (Prešov)

Jana Papcunová (Praha)

Lăčezar Perčeklijski (Blagoevgrad)

Anja Pohontsch (Bautzen/Budyšin)

Daniela Slančová (Prešov)

Ágnes Stemler (Budapest)

Tadeusz Szymański (Kraków)

Eline van der Veken (Leiden)

Jasna Vlajić-Popović (Beograd)

Click here for the complete list of Linguistic Bibliography contributors and information about becoming a contributor.

Editors

The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics is part of the Linguistic Bibliography, edited by Anne Aarssen, René Genis and Eline van der Veken. To contact the editors, please send an email to [email protected].

The three-volume print version of Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics, published in 2015 by Brill, was edited by Sijmen Tol and René Genis, with the assistance of Ekaterina Bobyleva and Eline van der Veken, and introduction by Marc L. Greenberg. Click here for more information about the print volumes.
The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics (BOSL) currently contains over 81,000 bibliographical references to linguistic publications on Slavic languages from the years 2000-2017, and is updated annually (last update: October 2018). A three-volume print edition for the years 2000-2014 was published by Brill in 2015. The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics is part of the larger project Linguistic Bibliography.

Abbreviations
Abstracting policy
Key features
Transliteration

Abbreviations
See the list of English, French, German and Russian abbreviations used in BOSL.

Abstracting policy
Abstracts and summaries of books and articles are included only in the online version of BOSL, and do not appear in the print version. Abstracts are displayed as they appear in the original publication, although formats may be edited for technical reasons, and copyright remains with the author and/or publisher.

Key Features
  • Contains over 81,000 bibliographical references
  • Links to full-text and library services
  • DOI links and abstracts increasingly available
  • Annual updates with ± 5,000 new references added per year
  • Compiled, analyzed, and annotated by an international team of specialists
  • Simple, full-text search and advanced search
  • Save, print and email bibliographic references
  • Export citations in various formats to compile and refine your own bibliography

Subjects included in BOSL:

  • Slavic languages
  • theoretical linguistics
  • biographical data on linguists (e.g. biographies, obituaries)

Publication forms included in BOSL:

  • books: monographs and edited volumes incl. Festschriften and conference proceedings
  • articles from journals incl. e-journals and open access
  • chapters from edited volumes
  • short research notes and squibs
  • reviews and review articles
  • bibliographies
  • PhD dissertations
  • textbooks and handbooks catered to students
  • online resources
  • obituaries
  • dictionaries on lesser studied languages
  • primary sources and language documentation, especially of lesser studied languages, e.g. corpora, word lists

Transliteration
Names and titles in Cyrillic script are transliterated according to the following transliteration table (opens as pdf). As of 2016, names and titles in the original Cyrillic are added to bibliographic descriptions whenever available.

Within international linguistics, the study of Slavic languages enjoys considerable interest. The extensive coverage of Slavic languages in the Linguistic Bibliography is evidence of this. The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics Online brings together the details of substantial number of unique publications, carefully selected, classified, cross-referenced and indexed by professional bibliographers. All contributing bibliographers are specialized Slavists themselves. The selection includes over thirty publication languages including publications in Finnish, Estonian, Greek, Albanian, Dutch, English, German, Japanese, Hebrew. The Introduction by Marc L. Greenberg gives an overview of the state of scholarship in Slavic linguistics and the directions in which the field is headed.